Two Related Genus’s of Star Coral

Elliptical Star Coral

Elliptical Star Coral Fossil (Click to view large for fine details, then arrow back)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the variety of corals is so vast, it can be difficult  to identify species which requires a discreet eye. After close examination and research, I believe I have targeted its identity!

Elliptical star coral is named for its oval elongated shaped corallites or the calcareous cups from which the polyps protrude. Scientifically named Dichocoenia, stokesi, shown above, is a massive colonial coral that forms round humps up to 16 inch (40 centimetres) in diameter. These two characteristics coincide with my fossil quite well.

It is a fairly uncommon species, and has been placed on the Red List for Endangered Species. In 1995 off the Florida Keys, Dichocoenia, stokesi suffered from a disease called white plague which killed 95% of its colonies. It’s a slow growing variety for which the struggle to come back is fast diminishing, unless we humans do something about its plight and that of many other coral varieties.

Kingdoms : Animalia

Phylum:  Cnardia (Marine group with stinging cells)

Class:  Anthozoa (Flower Animal)

Order:  Scleratinia  (Modern species of Stony Coral)

Family:  Meandrinidae (meandering  form)

Genus: Dichocoenia (hump-forming or flattened corals with irregular calyces)

Species: stokesi (elliptical or pineapple star coral)

Blushing Star Coral Fossil

Blushing Star Coral Fossil (View Large)

Blushing Star Coral Fossil Side view showing flat plate form)

Blushing Star Coral Fossil
(Side view showing flat plate form)

 

 

 

 

 

Stephanocoenia, intersept  have tentacles that are commonly extended during daylight, unlike most coral. When touched, it rapidly retracts them causing a slight color change, which gives this coral its common name of “Blushing Star Coral”. It can be found in Florida, the Caribbean and Central American regions and as far south as Brazil. It’s found in a number of reef habitats including channels and lagoons. It grows massive encrusting colonies forming flattened domes. Corallites can be circular to polygonal. The two characteristics of flattened domes and corallite shapes are in line with my coral fossil shown above.

Nutrition: Like all coral, it has a symbiotic relationship with algae zooxanthellae. Through photosynthesis, the algae provides energy to the coral which in turn homes the algae. Food is caught as it passes by the coral tentacles whereby stinging cells called nematocysts stun and hold onto it.

Its earliest fossil record dates back to the Eocene period between 55 and 33 million years ago.

The Blushing Star Coral is also susceptible to white plague type II which exposes the skeleton by rapid tissue destruction and is also on the Red List of Threatened species.

star coral blushing 3

Blushing Star Cora. (View Large)
Source:
http://reefguide.org/carib/pixhtml/blushingstarcoral2.html

Kingdoms : Animalia

Phylum:  Cnardia (Marine group with stinging cells)

Class:  Anthozoa (Flower Animal)

Order: Scleratinia (Modern species of Stony Coral)

Family:  Astrocoeniid  (small family made up of  both reef building and non reef building  genus, both with and without symbiotic zooxanthellae as well as both branching and encrusting species.

Genus: Stephanocoenia (Colonies are flattened usually with regular, smooth surfaces. Corallites are small and the wall between them may be relatively wide.)

Species: intersepta

 

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8 thoughts on “Two Related Genus’s of Star Coral

    • Hee . . . good word . . . works for me! Id – ing coral is tricky and have in the past thought I identified something to find out later it wasn’t the case. Getting better at it though. There are so many similarities, but slight differences in patterns and shapes.

  1. I enjoyed the post and also the video. Bonaire looks to be a great place to visit. The salt mines were interesting too, but the coral under water amazing. I also want to say your photo is very nice, a pretty picture of you.

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